Piracy and Diplomacy in Seventeenth-Century North Africa
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Piracy and Diplomacy in Seventeenth-Century North Africa The Journal of Thomas Baker, English Consul in Tripoli, 1677-1685 by C. R. Pennell

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Published by Fairleigh Dickinson University Press .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Diplomacy,
  • Shipping,
  • History - General History,
  • Diplomatic History,
  • Pirates,
  • History: American,
  • Mediterranean Region,
  • Africa - General,
  • Baker, Thomas,
  • Diaries,
  • 1551-1912,
  • 17th century,
  • Commerce,
  • History,
  • Libya

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages261
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL8223173M
ISBN 100838633021
ISBN 109780838633021

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Piracy and Diplomacy in Seventeenth-Century North Africa: The Journal of Thomas Baker, English Consul in Tripoli, (Book). Book. Piracy and Diplomacy in Seventeenth-century North Africa The Journal of Thomas Baker, English Consul in Tripoli, Piracy and diplomacy in seventeenth-century North Africa. Rutherford: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press ; London: Associated University Presses, © (OCoLC) Online version: Baker, Thomas, or Piracy and diplomacy in seventeenth-century North Africa. This book reviews the intriguing history of Barbary pirates who operated off the shore of North Africa in the seventeenth century with extraordinary effectiveness and who later motivated the creation of a new navy for the United States. For those interested in maritime history, it covers an important period of armed conflict on the high seas.4/5(23).

  This book reviews the intriguing history of Barbary pirates who operated off the shore of North Africa in the seventeenth century with extraordinary effectiveness and who later motivated the creation of a new navy for the United States. For those interested in maritime history, it covers an important period of armed conflict on the high seas.4/5(23). The purpose of this book is to present seven complete captivity narratives from among the twenty-five or so extant accounts that are set in North Africa and were written between , when John Fox escaped from his captivity in Egypt, and , when Joseph Pitts's memoir of captivity and conversion to Islam was published (see the bibliography. Piracy and Diplomacy in Seventeenth-century North Africa. Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, Bamford, Paul W. The Barbary Pirates: Victims and the Scourge of Christendom. Associates of the James Ford Bell Library, University of Minnesota, Earle, Peter. Corsairs of Malta.   Pirates of Barbary: Corsairs, Conquests and Captivity in the Seventeenth-Century Mediterranean by Adrian Tinniswood book review. Click to read the full review of Pirates of Barbary: Corsairs, Conquests and Captivity in the Seventeenth-Century Mediterranean in New York Journal of Books. Review written by Lisa Verge : Adrian Tinniswood.

Mediterranean piracy was multinational, undertaken by the Spanish, French, Dutch and British, as well as North Cite this page Esra, Jo-Ann, “Diplomacy, Piracy and Commerce: Christian-Muslim Relations between North Africa, the Ottoman Empire and Britain c. ”, in: Christian-Muslim Relations - , General Editor David Thomas. Piracy and Diplomacy in Seventeenth-century North Africa. Fairleigh Dickinson University, Bamford, Paul W. The Barbary Pirates: Victims and the Scourge of Christendom. Associates of the James Ford Bell Library, University of Minnesota, Captured by Pirates. Fern Canyon Press,   Piracy, slavery, captivity, and redemption were compelling subjects in the sixteenth and seventeenth century; Daniel J. Vitkus and Nabil Matar have, in this well-edited volume of early English images of the Islamic world, made them equally fascinating to twenty-first-century academic and lay . Pirates of Barbary: Corsairs, Conquests and Captivity in the Seventeenth-Century Mediterranean Adrian Tinniswood From Publishers Weekly Forget the pirates of the Caribbean: their Old World brethren were an altogether more colorful and fearsome lot, according to this swashbuckling study.